The Rag Literary Magazine June issue 6

The Rag Literary Magazine Issue 6

Seth Porter , Daniel Reilly , Justin Duerr (illustrator)

Genre: Anthology, Short Stories, Contemporary Fiction, Literary Fiction, Poetry, Magazine

Five stars

Personal failure, self-examination, and the tyranny of entropy fill the pages of the Rag Lit Mag in June. Staying true to the monthly anthology’s gritty theme, the tales range from base to darkly whimsical on a tour through the self. My favorites for this issue were Best Work and On Bread Alone with their forays into the whimsical and departure from grim reality into both symbolic and spiritual regions. One or two tales, I felt ended too soon.

Best Work shocked and charmed with the artist’s self-destructive (literally) artistic process and the near-prophetic nature of his meeting with the homeless girl and her voracious drawing.

Bread Alone spun a bittersweet tale of a man who lived multiple lives through different bodies, jumping haphazardly from one to the next, yet knowing every thought and experience of the new self. The narrator’s profound love and ensuing spiritual journey was both ridiculous and beautiful.

The featured artwork was fascinating, and made me want to zoom in and examine closely the active, colorful, joyful, images tinged with terror and darkness.

The poetry in this issue fit well with the theme, illuminating scenes in sharp detail and drawing me into their emotion.

I received this book from the author for the purposes of an unbiased review.

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The Rag Vol. 5

rag pic 2

The Rag, Vol 5

Genre: Literary Fiction, Magazine, Anthology, Poetry

Four Stars

The Rag promises gritty, cutting-edge writing, and it delivers. The stories and poetry in volume 5 pulled no punches. Many of the stories in this issue focus on crime and the people close to it, whether fighting it, contemplating it or committing it. My favorite, called The Girl With Pretention in Her Hair by Bill Lytton, gave us a peek inside the judgmental mind of a man on the subway contemplating the profound ugliness of those around him. We’ve all done it, and the honesty of the piece overcomes the treacherous quality of the act of presuming on the lives of people we have never met.

I confess that I really didn’t understand the poetry at all. A few truths seemed to surface for me, but I guess I’m not hip enough to really comprehend the whole.

Between the writing, the art pieces featured by Meredith Robinson really dazzled me. They are both predatory and awkward, the colors warming the blankness of the animal expressions.

I love, too, the juxtaposition of a digital magazine that brings the reader back in time to a past medium of anthologies, cutting edge and literary tradition. Take a look at The Rag, a unique and progressive approach to literature.

goodreads page: http://goo.gl/QCG2S
amazon page: http://goo.gl/bo92K